Recent Changes

Wednesday, December 8

Monday, December 6

  1. page Home edited ... Brendan (Bjag8794) Maryanrun (Maryanrun) ... 27 Sept 2010. < 2010 <http://www.guar…
    ...
    Brendan (Bjag8794)
    Maryanrun (Maryanrun)
    ...
    27 Sept 2010. <2010 <http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2003/sep/13/featuresreviews.guardianreview1>
    "Reading Lolita
    ...
    Books." Amazon. n.p., n.d. Web. 27 Sept 2010.2010 <http://www.amazon.co.uk/Reading-Lolita-Tehran-Memoir-Books/dp/0007178484>
    (view changes)
    6:05 am
  2. page Oppression- By Ela edited ... I can't help but wonder if the article "Bans on veils risks another form of oppression&qu…
    ...
    I can't help but wonder if the article "Bans on veils risks another form of oppression" by Craig and Marc Kielburger (http://www.thestar.com/news/globalvoices/article/779796--ban-on-veils-risks-another-form-of-oppression) is an example of the Western world 'condemning what it doesn't understand'. The article looks at a draft law submitted by the French government to issue a partial ban on wearing the burqa.
    The Kielburger brothers argue that forcing women to wear the veil is also a violation of human rights, and I agree. The article quotes French President Nicolas Sarkozy saying, “The burqa is not a sign of religion, it is a sign of subservience" (Kielburger). I disagree with this statement, and I believe many of the people in Reading Lolita in Tehran would disagree with this statement too. In this interview (http://www.randomhouse.ca/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9781588360793&view=auqa) with Random House Readers Circle, Nafisi says, "My grandmother never took off her veil until the day she died, and she lived a long life. For her the veil was a symbol of faith, but if every woman was forced to wear it, whether she believed in it or not, then it would become a symbol of force and a political symbol of the state" (Random House Reader's Circle). I agree with the Kielburger brothers that, regardless of the pretense of "liberation" it is just as wrong to forbid someone from covering their body as it is to force them to. Like Nafisi's grandmother, many women feel it is a symbol of their faith, that should not be taken taken away from them beause some officials, on both sides of the discussion, have confused religion and politics.
    ...
    into the theriputictherapeutic effects of
    I believe on of the simplest forms of oppression the women of Tehran face is how undervalued they are. "Most of these girls have never had anyone praise them for anything in their lives. They have never been told that they are any good or that they should think independently" (Nafisi, 221) Let us hope that this will never become a reality in our society, for the only time a country will meet its full potential is when each its citizens has met their full potential, and this starts will equality.
    In this media journal I focus on how women have been oppressed in Iran. By no means are women the only group which faces oppression, "Once a writer's apartment was found unlocked. Two weeks later they discovered that he had been whisked away by the secret police, for questioning" (Nafisi, 226). But women do represent a significant portion of the population and they are who Nafisi focuses on in Reading Lolita in Tehran.
    Kielburger,"Afgahnistan's Veil of Oppression." CBS Evening News 23 Oct. 2000. 30 Nov. 2010 <http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2000/
    10/23/eveningnews/main243429.shtml>
    "Author Interview - A conversation with Azar Nafisi." Random House n.d. 28 Nov. 2010 <http://www.randomhouse.ca/
    catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9781588360793&view=auqa>
    Kielburger,
    Craig and
    ...
    Toronto Star. n.p., 15 Mar. 2010: n.pag. Web.2010. 28 Nov. 2010 <http://www.thestar.com/news/globalvoices/article/779796--ban-on-veils-risks-another-form-of-oppression>
    Morrison, Blake. "The Reading Cure." The Guardian. 5 Jan. 2008.
    28 Nov. 2010. <http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2008/
    jan/05/fiction.scienceandnature>

    "Muslim Veils
    ...
    burqa." ApologeticsIndex. n.p., n.d. Web. 28 Nov. 2010.
    "Author Interview - A conversation with Azar Nafisi." Random House. n.p., n.d. Web. 28 Nov. 2010.
    "Afgahnistan's Veil of Oppression." CBS Evening News. n.p., 23 Oct. 2000. Web. 30 Nov. 2010
    <http://www.apologeticsindex.org/
    505-muslim-veils-hijab-burqa>
    Nafisi, Azar. Reading Lolita in Tehran. New York: Randomhouse, 2003. Print.

    "Persian Dance
    ...
    Dec. 2010.
    Nafisi, Azar. Reading Lolita in Tehran. New York: Randomhouse, 2003 . Print.
    <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZaH9cMhOeY>
    "Prayer to
    ...
    Oppression." PrayerBrowsing. n.p., n.d. Web.Oct.-Nov. 2009. 1 Dec. 2010.
    Morrison, Blake. "The Reading Cure." The Guardian. n.p., 5 Jan. 2008: n.pag. Web. 5 Jan. 2008.
    <http://prayerwarriors.wordpress.com/2009/10/30/prayer-to-fight-oppression-october-31-november-6-2009/oppression>
    (view changes)
    5:58 am
  3. page Home edited ... Brendan (Bjag8794) Maryanrun (Maryanrun) ... Veil." Guardian.co.uk. n.p.,13 13 Sep…
    ...
    Brendan (Bjag8794)
    Maryanrun (Maryanrun)
    ...
    Veil." Guardian.co.uk. n.p.,1313 Sept 2003: N.Pag. Web.2003. 27 Sept 2010. <
    "Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books." Amazon. n.p., n.d. Web. 27 Sept 2010.
    (view changes)
    5:45 am

Sunday, December 5

  1. msg I lost my first reply ;___; message posted I lost my first reply ;___; okay, so i replied to this earlier but it somehow disappeared? Ugh, so unfortunate. Anyway, I re…
    I lost my first reply ;___;
    okay, so i replied to this earlier but it somehow disappeared? Ugh, so unfortunate.

    Anyway, I really enjoyed reading your journal Kanwal. I liked how you picked one thing about Manna and your Dad and somehow were able to build an entire journal about that one thing! I guess it's because eyes are really interesting, yeah? To be honest, I never really saw much to be found in another's eyes. I see eyes as a good way to get someone's attention (eye contact) and that's about it. But there is much more to be found, right? You can communicate much more. I guess it's because I'm terrible at reading other's emotions that it is hard for me to see much from another's eyes.

    What about you?
    9:37 pm
  2. msg Very Succinct message posted Very Succinct Actually Ela, I didn't really find myself connecting to Yassi in the other sections of the memoir. …
    Very Succinct
    Actually Ela, I didn't really find myself connecting to Yassi in the other sections of the memoir. I think she has a lot more courage than I do and maybe that is because she has been put in situations where she was given the opportunity to be courageous more than I have. But really, Yassi is much more grand of a person than I am.

    Thanks for reading and reply Ela!
    9:19 pm
  3. msg Isn't Nafisi too harsh? message posted Isn't Nafisi too harsh? "the day women did not wear the scarf in public would be the real day of his death and the end…
    Isn't Nafisi too harsh?
    "the day women did not wear the scarf in public would be the real day of his death and the end of the revolution"

    Statements like this made it really hard for me to read Nafisi's memoir. Obviously, she views the veil as a sign of oppression and for her it most definitely was. But at the same time she gives people the impression that all who wear the veil are being oppressed, don't you think?

    I believe the only place in the novel where she actually talked about how the veil could also be a sign of faith was when she talked about her grandmother (you mentioned it in your journal). It actually saddens me that she is so harsh on the veil, something many of my friends and family value as a symbol of religion and loyalty to God. I'm sure the negative statements she makes about the veil will resonate more with people than the positive statements. In the end, the veil is a symbol of religion for most of the women who wear it and I feel like most people see it as if it is a symbol of oppression for most who wear it. I think Nafisi aides that mentality with her thoughtless statements. It kind of makes me sick in a way.

    However, I really did like your journal. You handled the topic much more eloquently than I think Nafisi did. You were definitely more sensitive. Good job!
    9:14 pm
  4. msg Will the "American Dream" no longer be America's? message posted Will the "American Dream" no longer be America's? Brendan, good job on this media journal. I really enjoyed reading it. You have a really clear way o…
    Will the "American Dream" no longer be America's?
    Brendan, good job on this media journal. I really enjoyed reading it. You have a really clear way of writing in that you get your points across quickly while at the same time providing enough evidence to back up your arguments that it isn't too quick. This is a talent I've never had, so I'm glad I could read your journal.

    Also, I have never watched the Godfather so I'm curious, does Bonasera continue living the American Dream? Or does it end for him when the American justice system fails him?

    I know you said that you don't believe the American Dream would ever die, but I was wondering, could this dream die for individuals? I mean, dreams are special because they give us hope for the future, and even though that dream is unattained, does one ever stop dreaming? I suppose this is a bit of a personal question requiring thought reaching beyond what you said in your journal and beyond what Azar Nafisi discusses in her memoir, but I'd really like to know what you think.
    8:38 pm
  5. msg The Point of Community message posted The Point of Community also, Ela! Thank you for reading and replying, I really enjoyed reading what you had to say! Bre…
    The Point of Community
    also, Ela! Thank you for reading and replying, I really enjoyed reading what you had to say!

    Brendon, again you bring some very interesting points that have really got me thinking. But, I'll stay by original stance that some communities are superior to others. Even when it comes to satisfying the need for belonging, I believe certain communities are superior to others. Let's take the gang and school community examples again; you might feel that you belong in a gang the same way you feel that you belong in a school club, but are the two qualities of belonging the same? In a gang, you are constantly living in fear that you might be killed (sometimes by your own gang (community) members) or arrested. Whereas in a school club, that fear does not exist. Now, can you still see that all communities are equal?

    A community's purpose is to provide the need for belonging, but at the same time, the quality of belonging does play a big role.
    8:07 pm

More